Press

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

 

Over the years, George Esquivel has made custom shoes for Hollywood heavyweights LeBron James, Bruno Mars, Janelle Monae, Brad Pitt and Gwen Stefani, among others. But his latest project is more under-the-radar: a summer-ready collab with fellow SoCal designer Gregory Parkinson. 

The colorful output mixes and matches Parkinson's canvas block prints used in his interiors works on classic Esquivel footwear silhouettes like a lace-up oxford ($600), mule ($600) and chukka boot ($650), plus folios ($250-$350) and a tote ($775).

The pair of creatives met as members of the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund almost a decade ago, and have stayed true to their artisanal brand values.

Both guys respond powerfully to the ancient tradition of handwork, which is always slightly unique. Parkinson painstakingly designs and develops his prints with a workshop in Calcutta during long stints in India. (“It’s not a quick in and out. I wanted the life experience of being there and living there as a local,” he says.) Esquivel has developed a distinct style for distressing his shoe designs, hand-burnishing, hand-stitching and hand-sewing them to perfect imperfection. “Gregory and I are really about the craft,” says Esquivel. 


For full article click here: https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/george-esquivel-gregory-parkinson-collab-summer-s-coolest-shoe-1124544

Vogue

Vogue

 

Print-obsessed fashion editors likely miss the days of Gregory Parkinson’s ready-to-wear collections, which quietly ceased production in 2015. We remember his party dresses and daytime frocks for their mood-enhancing prints (often mixed together), custom textiles, and hand-finished details—and they look exactly, uncannily, like the dresses we wish we were wearing this summer. You can’t walk down the halls of Vogue HQ without seeing at least one girl in a vibrant floral dress, and Parkinson’s made a singular statement. (You can find a few of his dresses on The RealReal and eBay, but I’ve yet to see this Resort 2014 look; hit me up if you do.)


These days, Parkinson channels his passion for prints and textiles into a successful home range. In lieu of his former watercolor florals, his new obsession is Indian block printing: He works with a team of artisans in Calcutta to make every piece by hand, so each is one of a kind. For those unfamiliar with the technique, it’s somewhat self-explanatory. Large wooden blocks are hand-carved with specific designs, dipped into dyes, and stamped onto cotton, canvas, or silk row by row to create a repeat pattern. (Experts do it with razor-sharp precision, but in India, they embrace tiny imperfections because they reveal the hand.)


For full article click here: https://www.vogue.com/article/gregory-parkinson-george-esquivel-block-printed-shoes-collaboration

Robb Report

Robb Report

 

Two all-American brands—one a Southern California shoemaker the other a Kansas City outfitter—have joined forces to create a new limited-edition line of classic, collectable kicks. The Esquivel x Baldwin capsule collection comprises six styles, three men’s and three women’s, that represent the commitment to local craftsmanship upon which the two brands were founded.

“This is a like-minded collaboration of handcrafted goods,” explains Matt Baldwin, who founded his eponymous Missouri-based apparel company in 2009 with a dedication to reviving the premium-denim industry. “It’s about coming together to create a quality, American-made product.”

The Baldwin brand was first born as a modest Midwestern clothing store before swiftly rising to national level—with additional locations today in Los Angeles, New York, Leawood, and Dallas—thanks to its tailored-yet-worn-in take on jeans. Its line pays homage to the working-class heritage of denim, sourcing premium fabric from world-class mills for its enduring selvage styles. And, to achieve the ultimate authentic wash and fit, the company uses customers’ reclaimed, broken-in jeans as templates to create its unique washes.

Esquivel, too, is hyper-focused on homegrown style and high-quality materials. Crafted from premium leathers, every shoe from the nearly 17-year-old label—whose celebrity fan base spans from Bruno Mars and Kevin Costner to the entire Paris Saint-Germain soccer team—is cut and lasted by hand at the company’s Orange County workshop before being treated with dyes and creams and paired with handmade laces for the perfect finish. And while the namesake founder and designer, George Esquivel, might not be afraid of quirkiness in his creations (one of his signatures is hand-painting classic silhouettes with unexpected pops of color), the pieces he designed with Baldwin are decidedly more timeless.

For full article click here: https://robbreport.com/style/footwear/small-luxury-brands-baldwin-esquivel-launch-shoe-collaboration-2770755/

 

WWD

WWD

 

OFF THE PITCH: Colette on Wednesday celebrated its ongoing relationship with the Paris Saint-Germain soccer club with the launch of a limited-edition pair of boots and a sweatshirt aimed at female supporters.

Paris Saint-Germain has been expanding into the lifestyle segment since it fell under Qatari ownership in 2011, said Fabien Allègre, merchandising and brand diversification director at the club.

“The idea was to go beyond the pitch and, through the Parisian values that we try to represent in all humility, to try to reach people who are not necessarily fans of soccer, but who love Paris, again, for the values the city represents, whether it’s the fashion side or tradition, knowhow and aesthetics,” he told WWD.

 

For full article click here: https://wwd.com/fashion-news/fashion-scoops/colette-paris-saint-germain-collaborations-esquivel-iro-10889360/



The Art of Being Female

The Art of Being Female

 

I was first made aware of Esquivel shoes at A’Marees, the beautiful boutique on the water in Newport Beach a few years ago. They have carried the handcrafted and locally made shoes for many years and I finally ordered my first custom pair. Since then, I’ve gotten to know both George and his amazing wife, Shelley. I love the fact that they have kept their business local in Orange County, California, since they founded the company in 2001 and that they have stayed true to their core belief of handmade shoes. They are an amazing duo and remain humble, even though Esquivel makes shoes for many celebrities, business titans and sports legends that shall remain anonymous.

The Art of Being Female

Their working relationship is inspiring. As we all know, that can be a tough road for a married couple and I respect George so much for giving his wife Shelley lots of credit for their success. I admire George as well, as his childhood was not easy. He took his negative circumstances and turned them around and their charity work is a testament to his background and helping others in what used to be his unfortunate circumstances.

 

For full article click here:  http://www.artofbeingfemale.com/office-shelley-george-esquivel-esquivel-shoes/

LA Times

LA Times

 

George Esquivel has quietly carved out a name for himself as the premier shoemaker in Los Angeles: His handcrafted shoes command prices starting at $495 for ready-made suede oxfords to upward of $19,000 for bespoke crocodile boots. Each year Esquivel’s small team of craftspeople produces 3,000 to 5,000 pairs of footwear for a client list that includes Emma Stone, LeBron James, Laura Dern, Brad Pitt and Bruno Mars and retailers such as Fred Segal and Barneys New York. The 47-year-old designer, who served a two-year stint as creative director for luxury luggage brand Tumi, also has a proclivity for collaboration: His label has teamed up with the likes of Tommy Hilfiger, haute hat maker Nick Fouquet, The Beverly Hills Hotel and The Spare Room, the buzzy gaming lounge inside The Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, for which he creates high-style bowling shoes.

Esquivel operates out of a nondescript warehouse-style office complex in Buena Park. Yet behind the generic exterior is an atelier that sustains the old-world tradition of artisanal shoemaking, now a rare trade in the United States. Premium leather and exotic skins are sourced from Italy, France and Spain, and each shoe panel is individually hand-cut, skived (a thin shaving of the leather to facilitate smooth folds) and stitched on site; then lining, buckles, zippers or elastic are sewn in. Completed upper panels are scrupulously massaged onto a last (“Too tight and it won’t stretch, too loose and it will look sloppy,” notes Esquivel) before a welt, soles and heels are built in from the bottom of the shoe. Specialty finishes—hand-burnishing, hand-tooling or personalized patterns, names and dates that can be burned into the leather with a hot pen—add another layer of character. Even the brand’s signature shoelaces are stitched by hand. Recycled corrugated cardboard shoe boxes have handles crafted from upcycled leather remnants, while shoe bags are sewn from unique deadstock fabrics.

 

For full article click here :  https://www.latimes.com/designla/la-design-la-george-esquivel-20180327-story.html

Footwear News

Footwear News

 

Shoe designer George Esquivel and Venice, Calif.-based hat maker Nick Fouquet teamed up to create a fall ’16 range of men’s shoes produced in Esquivel’s Orange County factory. Scroll down to see the collection.

But first, the two men talk with Footwear News about on the steps that went into blending their laid-back California aesthetics.

Step 1: Igniting the Conversation

Esquivel and Fouquet met while both participating in the “Wear LACMA” project this year, where the art museum enlisted 19 local designers to create one-off pieces. “We started talking, and it evolved easily,” said Esquivel. “Nick, like me, is a craftsman. He works with his hands.” Meanwhile, Fouquet was excited by the challenge of making his first foray into footwear and was immediately drawn to Esquivel’s hands-on manufacturing process. “I love things that have a story and a soul,” he said.

 

Step 2: Gathering Inspiration

After initial talks, Esquivel and Fouquet found inspiration by looking to their own shoe collections. “When I came to George, I had on these really old pair of shoes I found in London,” said Fouquet. “They were new when I bought them, but over time they developed an interesting patina, so we reinterpreted that.” Riffing off the idea, the two jumped right in and started experimenting — no sketches involved. “What’s the point of sketching if I can actually go downstairs and physically touch samples?” Esquivel asked.

Step 3: Diving Into Design

Esquivel and Fouquet decided to focus on a streamlined silhouette with handmade flourishes. “We wanted the design to be simple, but the process to make them is where the craftsmanship came through,” Esquivel said. Their efforts resulted in a lace-up boot and oxford shoe, crafted with hand-cut soles and hand-punched perforations. The Californians combined their skills more easily than expected. “I was surprised at the similarities between how we work,” said Esquivel. “The process for shaping hats is very similar to shaping shoes. He starts with a block, and I start with a last.”

For full article click here:  https://footwearnews.com/2016/focus/collaborations/george-esquivel-nick-fouques-fall-2016-shoe-collaboration-launch-228059/

 

Forbes

 

 

 

It is said that if you would like to know if a gentlemen is well dressed, then look down at his shoes. There is also a theory that any man who respects quality footwear is more than likely to achieve success because essentially, he understands the value of working his way up from the bottom. In a word, footwear articulates a man's style not to mention his social position.

The history of footwear is a long one. The first shoes were basically soles constructed from wood or leather. It pains me to think how uncomfortable not to mention unsanitary these first shoes must have been. At first they were secured by leather straps or the like that kept them from falling off. Luckily, we have surely come a long way since then. The reason leather had become popular is because it breathes. Henceforth, when footwear started to enclose around the foot, leather permitted the air to circulate. The need from the start had been durability and believe it or not, that is still a key feature for today's consumer. In a man's life time, it is estimated that we walk 120,000 miles give or take a mile. It is no wonder that Leonardo da Vinci called the foot a masterpiece of engineering as well as a work of art. In modern times, I have witnessed footwear being delivered in all shapes and sizes. But one thing is for sure; the rule still applies that footwear should have a direct relationship to the cut of the trousers. While black dress shoes have always been considered obligatory for suiting’s, these days interesting color waves and laces offer equal refinement if not superior style. 

Welcome George Esquival. This is a brand that combines a modern aesthetic with a timeless sensibility, all with a Southern California, casual sophistication. Producing a limited quantity of hand-made shoes for select retailers and personal clients throughout the world, Esquivel is able to tell a story with each pair through signature hand finishes and a refined finesse developed over two decades of practice. Leathers are Forbessourced from the finest tanneries in the world, and every line cut and stitch sewn by hand to create an unmistakable footprint. He has made shoes for everyone from Lebron James to Brad Pitt among many others.

 

For full article click here: https://www.forbes.com/sites/josephdeacetis/2018/08/17/esquivel-footwear-casual-sophistication-made-in-california/#2d8200e93da2